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Chinese Embassy Briefs NGOs in Britain on China's Position and Measures on Climate Change
2009/11/17

 

On November 12, Press Counsellor Liu Weimin had a meeting with representatives from eight non-governmental organizations located in Britain such as the Christian Aid, World Development Movement, WWF-UK, Friends of the Earth, Action Aid, Catholic Agency for Overseas Development and TEARFUND, and briefed them on China’s principle position and active measures on climate change.

Liu said, climate change is a big priority for the Chinese government. President Hu Jintao’s remarks on reducing “carbon density” at the UN climate change summit were well received across the world. China has issued the National Climate Change Programme and is stepping up efforts to deliver the target of a 20%-lower energy consumption per GDP unit in 2010 than 2005. In addition, China is committed to improve its energy structure and is making great efforts on renewable energy. It is among the world leaders in the application of solar and wind power. However, China is still a developing country and is facing the imbalance of economic growth, poverty reduction and the improvement of people’s lives against environmental protection. Assistance is still required in capital and core technology, making it difficult to quantify reduction targets at the current stage. Liu said, climate change is a major challenge facing the mankind and no country can stay immune to it. Response requires concerted efforts across the world. The Chinese government supports consensus-building on the basis of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and Kyoto Protocol, publicized the Document on China’s Stand in Copenhagen Climate Change Conference, and sincerely looks forward to a successful Copenhagen conference.

Participants thanked the embassy for the meeting, which they saw as evidence of China’s candid and open position on climate change. In the past few years, China has made evident progress on this issue and tremendous success on developing green energy. They applauded China’s position on adhering to the main channel of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change and Kyoto Protocol rather than taking other measures, and calling for the developed countries to take the lead in massive reduction and support the developing countries in capital and technologies. Some representatives raised specific suggestions on climate financing, indicating that the current EU carbon trade market has many flaws and fails to work effectively. The developed countries should use “predictable” capital as their primary funding source of assistance. China is recommended to coordinate positions with other developing countries on this issue.

Liu answered questions on China’s expectation for the Copenhagen Conference, the potential contents within the political agreement, the presence of Chinese leaders, the possibility of signing a China-US climate change agreement during President Obama’s visit to China, the core technologies in urgent need in China, the specific role that G20, G77 and other international mechanisms may play on climate change, China’s position on putting on auction the right of carbon emission, taxation of international aviation and shipping and the creation of a specialized institution for climate financing.

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